Monthly Archives: July 2020

Sunday 2 August 2020

A very warm welcome to all who worship here today. Please stay for a cuppa and a chat after the service. Many thanks to Rev Hugh Perry for leading our worship this morning.

What’s On This Week:

Monday 9.30am Pastoral Care training course. Lyndsey 388 1264.

Tuesday 10am – 2pm South Elder Care. Lyndsey 388 1264.

Tuesday 7.15pm Christian Meditation Group. Contact Dugald 380 5024.

Wednesday 9.30am Port Hills U3A meeting.

Thursday 10am – 12 noon Crafty Crafters. Bring along your own craft items or learn a new skill. $3 per session. Jeannette 332 9869.

Thursday 1.30 – 2.30pm Sit & Keep Fit. See Anneke for more information.

Thursday 5pm (note new day) Familial Trust. Graeme 021 365 433.

Thursday 6pm Men’s Group. Contact Rob Connell 384 4320.

Wednesday Walkers 5th August: Meet 9.30am at Merchiston, 75 St Martins Rd— come up the drive. Parking for about 8 cars. Saunter around St Martins then return for coffee/tea/hot water. If wet it will become a “Talking group” but still happening.  Fern 332 4725.

BINS: Please be very careful when placing items in the Council bins. You can only put CLEAN paper, cardboard, glass, metal and plastics with code 1,2 or 5 in the yellow bin. Everything else goes in the red bin, and organic waste in the green bin. If in doubt, use the red bin. Contaminated recycling all ends up going to landfill, which is not ideal.

South Elder Care has a vacancy. Do you know anyone who is lonely, or has dementia, or would like some company? We offer a socially active programme. Please speak to Lyndsey 388 1264 or Jeannette 332 9869.

Formation of a Pastoral Visiting Team beginning on Monday 3rd August at 9.30am with morning tea on the Lounge. A six week interactive course for those who would like to be pastoral visitors. An invitation is extended to any Session member who would like to continue visiting and to any members of the congregation who enjoy visiting people. You may have done several courses before but the important part is that we are all on the same page. A group of 8-10 people would be great. A pamphlet is available in the foyer which outlines the course content. Everyone is welcome. Please write your name on the clipboard being circulated this morning, or contact Lyndsey McKay 388 1264; email lyndseymckay1@gmail.com

Parish Breakfast Sunday 16th August 8.45am hosted by the Men’s Group – all welcome.

The Men’s Group will meet in the church lounge at 6pm on Thursday 6th August. The speaker will be Angela Kearney who will speak on her experiences with UNICEF. Rob Connell 384 4320.

Church Cleaning: Moonlighters are now no longer in a position to clean the church, so we do need more volunteers please. Due to a change in the days the place is hired, it would be helpful if the premises could be cleaned on a Friday or Saturday if possible. See the UPDATED roster on the new noticeboard in the foyer (beside the storage cupboard).

ANNUAL REPORTS: Yes, folks, it’s that time of year again. Annual Reports are now required from: South Elder Care, Wednesday Walkers, Crafty Crafters, Foot Clinic, Fireside, Men’s Group, Worship committee, Meditation Group. Please email them to the Parish Office before 18th August. Accompanying photos also welcome! The AGM will be held in September.

Cashmere Sings! TODAY 3pm – 4.30pm, Cashmere Presbyterian Church, 2 Macmillan Avenue, entry by gold coin donation. An event for all the community: sing popular songs old and new from the Shows, Charts, and Music Halls. Enquiries to 332 7129.

Christchurch Family History Expo 14 – 15 August, 10am – 5pm

Turanga/Central Library. Free. Speakers, workshops, seminars and displays for anyone interested in how and where to build family history. To read more: https://my.christchurchcitylibraries.com/explore-family-history/

EcuAction 2020 Forum Series: Challenging the stuff ups! & offering some solutions
WEA Centre, 59 Gloucester St. 6th, 13th & 27th August, 5.30pm for 6–7.30pm
Programme, with expert presenter/ faith respondent:

  • August 6: Unregulated Capitalism Destroying the Planet (Charles Drace/Jim Consedine)
  • August 13: The Just and Creative Society our Education System Fails (Sue Bagshaw/Jane Higgins)
  • August 27: Land and Water We Could Soon Lose (Paul Broady/Kathleen Gallagher)

The presenter and respondent will make their presentations before the topic is opened up for “Questions, Answers & Comments”. All Welcome. Koha to defray expenses please. Organised by EcuAction, a Canterbury based ecumenical action group, co-hosted by the WEA. Further info from:  ecuactioncanterbury@gmail.com, or Marilyn (021 061 3940) or (Mary 021 387 088)

First Aid course 29th August 9am – 1pm

The Village Papanui are hosting a First Aid course, and there are still a few places available if you would like to update your skills in this area. Cost $75. Please contact Tracey 352 6197 or tracey@villagechurch.nz to book.


 
Garage Sale & Garden Tour: St. Andrew’s Church, Blenheim has a Garage Sale on Saturday 12th September and a Garden Tour on Saturday 17th and Sunday 18th October. If you feel like a break away, it’s not too far to come to sunny Marlborough and you might like to time your trip to fit in with one of these activities. Our Garden Tour is famous for spectacular gardens, wonderful stalls and refreshments when you need them and it only costs $20 pp. Enquiries to Kim at the Church Office 03 578 7119.

Come and hear Mike King give a FREE public talk about Normalising the Inner Critic – “that little voice inside our heads that’s constantly second-guessing us.” at The McCombs Performing Arts Centre (Cashmere High) 172 Rose St, TOMORROW at 7pm.

Posted in News | Comments Off on Sunday 2 August 2020

Sunday 26th July

Boundaries – Sermon by Martin Stewart

Over the summer I had the pleasure of reading a book called Boundaries by the Central Otago-based poet, Brian Turner.  He plays around with the idea of boundaries, asking his readers to think about the shifting nature of boundaries as well as the ones that don’t budge. 

In that Maniototo landscape, with the harsh summer sun and tough winters, the boundaries appear clear. 

If you don’t respect them then they can trouble you greatly; for the hills and the rivers will outlast any human, and they are no respecters of the boundaries of our existences. 

Turner notes how the application of boundary-frameworks produces contradictions: for instance, many locals thought that the rail trail proposal wouldn’t work, and they closed their minds to the vision of it,

but it has worked, and arguably saved the life of many of the small towns along its way; some farmers have stretched outside traditional practices and introduced irrigation and dairying in order for them to make their land economical, but others are counting the cost of the pollution of the waterways, and they feel that the boundary-lines of respect for the land have been violated. 

What are the boundaries that ought to be respected in agriculture?  I heard that Lake Ruataniwha had had a health warning for several days this year because of high levels of faecal bacteria in the water. How on earth does a lake in that area, at the top of a catchment come to be polluted?  Something is very wrong! 

How come some boundaries are sacred (like the economic notions of growth and progress) but other boundaries can be desecrated?  Is progress something that can be critiqued and stepped back from in respect of the boundaries?  Here’s a poem by Brian Turner:

Progress

1

There’s a need for a duet,
us and nature.  But as yet
we don’t know the music
nor the words to the song.

2

Nature doesn’t negotiate.

Deludeds, we only think
we draw the lines.

3

The way forward’s
back a bit
and sideways.

That would be

progress.

All of this has got me thinking about the boundaries we set, maintain, or dismiss. Are there edges that we just shouldn’t go to?  What would stepping back from them look like?  Conversely, are we so sure of some of our moral boundaries, that the suffering caused by our rigidity is justified?  Would we have been better to have taken a deep breath and given people different from us some breathing space?  But are there other areas where we should have stepped up?  Or intervened?  Or taken a stand?  How do we choose?

There are plenty of stories from our pasts about couples falling in love from across the religious divides of catholic and protestant – and families were split because of the intransigence of some of those parents. 

How long did this moral-high-ground banishment go on for?  For some it was a lifetime! What are the boundaries?  What does loosening them do?  Are our moral boundaries meant to be enshrined and rigid? 

Can’t we all identify that we have all changed our positions on quite a few moral issues over the years?

I believe that many of the walls we put up to protect the boundaries and resist change tend to look rather silly after a while.  Back in the day, the 6pm closing of pubs was designed to help support the idea of a healthy family unit, but for many it led to the disgusting cultural form called the six-o’clock swill, you know, that might still be among us in the form of the binge drinking culture prevalent in some parts of our society. 

Russians were once made to burn Beatles albums because of a perceived low moral standard.

Well-meaning people of faith once protested outside cinemas when Monty Python’s Life of Brian movie was released. 

Hundreds of marchers to Parliament once wore tee-shirts proclaiming ‘Enough is enough’

in an act of intimidation, while the majority of New Zealanders who were quietly asking for the state to back away from criminalising some people’s choice about who they loved.  I can name a number of people who were strident in their moral position about the sexual preferences of others but who changed their tune when it was one of their loved ones who admitted their struggles. 

Can you identify positions you have taken strongly that you now think about differently?  Of course you can! 

We have a couple of juicy moral dilemmas on the near horizon in the referenda on the End of Life and Legalisation of Cannabis Bills.  Once you might have assumed that Christians would have had a uniform response to both issues, but the ground has shifted and we don’t all think the same.

I’ve been thinking about some of the damage I might have been part of causing when I was younger and I took a strong position on a moral issue.  Who did I hurt?  Why was I like that?  Who coached me to think that it either has to be this or that?   Well… when you have a text saying ‘Let your word be “Yes, Yes” or “No, No”’ I can understand that some people would want to shape their world into a black-and-white-Jesus-said framework.

I have come to recognise that the Presbyterian form of government – the Westminster thing, has its origins in a right old fight about who has the truth of God and who doesn’t. And the adversarial system in our church courts tends to define us by what we are against – and who we are against, more than what we hold in common.  And I think we need to talk about whether it still serves us.  In the parish I was last in we worked hard to minimise ways of working that set people against each other.  We do the same in the Presbytery now.

Our long history of adversarial behaviour manifested over time into decisions about who is in with God and who is not,who is the elect and who is not, who can be baptised, and who can’t, who can receive communion, and who can’t, who can lead or minister, and who can’t?  And I’m a little tired of it. 

I think we can do better. And in many ways, I notice, we are already behaving in ways that suggest we want to relate more constructively.

But, in today’s text, Jesus appears to be very rigid about boundaries with regards to anger, adultery, lust, divorce and oaths.  So rigid does he appear to be, in relation to lust, that this is what Matthew records him saying: ‘If your right eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away; it is better for you to lose one of your members than for your whole body to be thrown into hell.  And if your right hand causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away; it is better for you to lose one of your members than for your whole body to go into hell.’

We would expect, wouldn’t we, that there would be a whole lot of honest people wandering around with only one eye, and one hand – this is a tough standard, and we are not perfect, and where our thoughts sometimes traverse can be problematic!  Do you know what I mean?

And I am sad to confess, that under a strict interpretation of this particular text, I would have no eyes and no hands.  But here I am, with two hands and two eyes, and a mouth at work preaching from your pulpit! 

And, to top it off, as I look upon you it appears that you too seem to have two eyes and two hands, and I wonder if any of us are taking this teaching seriously!!!  Is the boundary Jesus is conveying not clear?

Um, actually, it isn’t.  Because this text, like any text, looks a little unusual when interpreted in the wider framework of Jesus’ teachings.  In other places, Jesus seems to tell stories and behave in ways that are quite the opposite of a hard-line-pluck-your-eye-out moral position.

For I see Jesus showing us ‘who he is for ‘when he walked into Jericho and reached up into the sycamore tree and said to the hated Zaccheus, ‘can I come and eat with you today?’ 

And I see Jesus, kneeling on the ground, tracing patterns in the sand, while he patiently waits on the stone-throwers to lay down their weapons of ‘moral-high-ground-destruction’, and face up to their own brokenness. And I know Jesus says to the woman in that story go and sin no more and I wonder what the sin was.  Was it that she was lost and couldn’t find her way, and he was offering some light to straighten the trajectory of her life? 

And I hear Jesus calling his followers to forgive seventy times seven, and even if they met that threshold of generosity, they still won’t be anywhere near the kind of level of grace that God offers to each and every one of us.

And I hear Jesus saying we need to attend to the logs in our eyes before we try to scratch out the speck of imperfection we see in the eye of someone else.

I see Jesus constantly crossing the rigid boundaries. I see Jesus always offering me the light, and that’s what attracts me to him.  Not the moral stance on this issue or that, but how he seems to transcend our need to categorise everything so sparingly and sparsely into ‘right and wrong.’ 

He seems to have a lot more ‘both-and’ in him than we realise.  And that’s what grace is:  Crossing the divides.  Giving people a break.  Loving them to bits. 

The Apostle Paul tells us what it looks like when the Spirit of Jesus is at work, there’s an abundance of kindness, patience, generosity, gentleness, self-control, faithfulness, and there are oodles of love, joy, and peace.  That’s what I look for to know whether God is in the room. There is no law against such things, says Paul. 

I think we are to choose things and participate in things in ways that bring such life to the world.  I think our community deserves to hear the church announce this and practice this, I really do.  Could our morality be better served by the way we practice who we are for rather than who we are against

My observation is that what people seem to hear, more often than not, is the church telling them off,

as if Christians are society’s moral police, and the church is made up of people who have everything together.  Could we love the world as God does rather than judge it?  Could we lift up the weak and heavy laden as Jesus does and release them from the weight of their struggles?  Could we admit our brokenness a little more than we do and practice God’s unconditional forgiving love in our attitudes to others, and each other. So I stand here before you with both of my hands and both of my eyes.  But you know and I know

that if I took today’s very particular words of Jesus seriously, then I would have no eyes and no hands. 

But by his grace I stand, and by his grace you also stand, and for the love of the world, Jesus calls us to follow him. 

Choose love, he says.  Choose love. 

For in loving others you will find my life already at work in them, and in you.

Food for thought

Today we are having a think about boundariesA picture containing fence, grass, building, outdoor

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I have a small number of recent photographs I took of some boundary lines

This one is of a gorgeous gate at the old school in Burkes Pass

Quite a bit of effort went into crafting this beauty – humans tend to put a lot of effort into creating boundaries around property and at times one another

In this dreadful Covid-19 season, unfortunately, the virus has taken the statement of Jesus, wherever two or three are gathered, I am with you, too seriously!

Protecting our border has never been more important, and more challenging.

Anthropology Stge 3
origin of walls

predators both human and animals, cold,

then, each other

when did privacy begin and what form did it take?

Long House partitions of rocks for ‘privacy’

Hutterite sea chests = only part of their lives kept apart from the community

More sophisticated society = higher the fences

Boundaries, law, breaches, privacy act, crossing the boundaries been in the news a lot lately with quarantine breakouts and MP’s misbehaving

Boundaries are shifting, maybe tightening, but I sometimes wonder if the cries of anguish are full of hypocrisy, just hoping that the spotlight not on my secret life!!!

Wedding in Dunedin
mother of groom turned up at the first marriage prep appointment!!  I set up the actual prep with her excluded!

Iturned out home schooled two boys and attended each and every one of their university lectures with them.. yes its true!  Was she going to be going on the honeymoon???  No wonder the oldest boy shifted with his bride to the other side of the world!

A picture containing outdoor, grass, water, standing

Description automatically generated

You may try to contain me but I have to break through

In Germany if a prisoner escapes and caught again, no extra charge on them, it is their right to want to be free

A sign in a field

Description automatically generated

Holy Spirit like a bag blowing in the wind, blowing free – no respecter of boundaries. James K Baxter Song to the Holy Spirit – ‘you blow inside and outside the fences’

A bird sitting on top of a dry grass field

Description automatically generated

The journey of raising children is to start with clear boundaries and it is your job to slowly release the tension and give the child room. 

between us

it started

me as your protector
boundary rider

fearful one
holding you
as you cried your tears

after the fall onto the knee
already skinned
from yesterday’s adventure

but I always had a charge

to set you child free
to release the binding
slowly dismantle the fence
and risk the loss of you
to trust the process

it was my job

to slowly release the tension

and give you room

if I didn’t offer it

you would force me to do it
anyway it was always my job to make room

and it was yours to push out

and all has gone well,

despite my instinct to cling
now it is just a wire

but with a knot as strong
as strong can be

like faith, I guess

martin stewart

Posted in Sermons | Comments Off on Sunday 26th July

Sunday 26th July 2020

A very warm welcome to all who worship here today. Please stay for a cuppa and a chat after the service. Many thanks to Rev Martin Stewart for leading our worship this morning. Rev Hugh Perry will be with us again next week.

What’s On This Week:

Tuesday 10am – 2pm South Elder Care. Lyndsey 388 1264.

Tuesday 7.15pm Christian Meditation Group. Contact Dugald 380 5024.

Wednesday 1.30pm Fireside Women’s Group. Margaret 366 8936.

Thursday 10am – 12 noon Crafty Crafters. Bring along your own craft items or learn a new skill. $3 per session. Jeannette 332 9869.

Thursday 1.30 – 2.30pm Sit & Keep Fit. See Anneke for more information.

Thursday 5pm (note new day) Familial Trust. Graeme 021 365 433.

Wednesday Walkers 29th July: Meet 9.30am in the Carpark by Sumner Surf Club 9.30am  for walk along the Promenade and Sumner. Coffee will hopefully be at Dotcom.  All welcome Judith Mackay 027 688 1861.

Fireside on Wednesday: Fireside is a church group of women that meets monthly.  We welcome other women to join us whether it is regularly or occasionally.  We are planning to begin meeting in afternoons, beginning on Wednesday 29th July at 1.30pm for a post-lockdown get together and “party” afternoon tea.  A small plate for this would be appreciated.  Enquiries:  Margaret 366 8936.

BINS: Please be very careful when placing items in the Council bins. You can only put CLEAN paper, cardboard, glass, metal and plastics with code 1,2 or 5 in the yellow bin. Everything else goes in the red bin, and organic waste in the green bin. If in doubt, use the red bin. Contaminated recycling all ends up going to landfill, which is not ideal.

South Elder Care has a vacancy. Do you know anyone who is lonely, or has dementia, or would like some company? We offer a socially active programme. Please speak to Lyndsey 388 1264 or Jeannette 332 9869.

Formation of a Pastoral Visiting Team beginning on Monday 3rd August at 9.30am with morning tea on the Lounge. A six week interactive course for those who would like to be pastoral visitors. An invitation is extended to any Session member who would like to continue visiting and to any members of the congregation who enjoy visiting people. You may have done several courses before but the important part is that we are all on the same page. A group of 8-10 people would be great. A pamphlet is available in the foyer which outlines the course content. Everyone is welcome. Please write your name on the clipboard being circulated this morning, or contact Lyndsey McKay 388 1264; email lyndseymckay1@gmail.com

Giving Envelopes: if you are running low, please see Joan Macdonald.

The Men’s Group will meet in the church lounge at 6pm on Thursday 6th August. The speaker will be Angela Kearney who will speak on her experiences with UNICEF. Rob Connell 384 4320.

Church Cleaning: Moonlighters are now no longer in a position to clean the church, so we do need more volunteers please. Due to a change in the days the place is hired, it would be helpful if the premises could be cleaned on a Friday or Saturday if possible. See the roster on the new noticeboard in the foyer (beside the storage cupboard).

ANNUAL REPORTS: Yes, folks, it’s that time of year again. Annual Reports are now required from: South Elder Care, Wednesday Walkers, Crafty Crafters, Foot Clinic, Fireside, Men’s Group, Worship committee, Meditation Group. Please email them to the Parish Office before 18th August. Accompanying photos also welcome! The AGM will be held in September.

Menzshed Update

The electronics workshop in the old Sunday School building is already being used.  It is in need of better heating.  Next door the smoko room (no smoking but lots of tea and coffee) is up and running with regular working bees each Wednesday and Saturday.  About 600 hours of voluntary labour has gone into the complex so far with over 30 men signed up as members.

The structural skirt around the base of the relocated classroom to brace the piles has been completed, and the huge ramp for disabled access and steps to enter this building almost complete.  Nick Wilson has been rewiring the building so it can be used as a woodworking workshop with 3 phase power.  We still have to get sign off from the Fire Engineer after lining the north wall with 40mm fire gib.  Once this sign off is obtained we will ask the CCC to give us a license to occupy.   There have been some very generous donations of equipment and tools for which we are very thankful.

Opening is projected for September but we hope to organise a special preview for church members after church one Sunday in August.

Posted in News | Comments Off on Sunday 26th July 2020

Sunday 19th July 2020

A very warm welcome to all who worship here today. Please stay for a cuppa and a chat after the service. Many thanks to Rev Chris Elliot for leading our worship today. Rev Martin Stewart will be with us next week.

TODAY: Soup & Rolls provided by Session for all – please stay and enjoy a light meal and spend time catching up. Everyone is very welcome.

What’s On This Week:

Tuesday 10am – 2pm South Elder Care. Lyndsey 388 1264.

Tuesday 7.15pm Christian Meditation Group. Contact Dugald 380 5024.

Thursday 10am – 12 noon Crafty Crafters. Bring along your own craft items or learn a new skill. $3 per session. Jeannette 332 9869.

Thursday 1.30 – 2.30pm Sit & Keep Fit. See Anneke for more information.

Wednesday Walkers 22nd July: Meet 9.30am at Edge Café, corner of Edgeware Rd and Trafalgar St for a walk around St Albans. Please park in Trafalgar Street. All welcome. Barbara & Alan 0211263801 or 337 6202.

BINS: Please be very careful when placing items in the Council bins. You can only put CLEAN paper, cardboard, glass, metal and plastics with code 1,2 or 5 in the yellow bin. Everything else goes in the red bin, and organic waste in the green bin. If in doubt, use the red bin. Contaminated recycling all ends up going to landfill, which is not ideal.

Formation of a Pastoral Visiting Team beginning on Monday 3rd August at 9.30am with morning tea on the Lounge. A six week interactive course for those who would like to be pastoral visitors. An invitation is extended to any Session member who would like to continue visiting and to any members of the congregation who enjoy visiting people. You may have done several courses before but the important part is that we are all on the same page. A group of 8-10 people would be great. A pamphlet is available in the foyer which outlines the course content. Everyone is welcome. Please write your name on the clipboard being circulated this morning, or contact Lyndsey McKay 388 1264; email lyndseymckay1@gmail.com

ANNUAL REPORTS: Yes, folks, it’s that time of year again. Annual Reports are now required from: South Elder Care, Wednesday Walkers, Crafty Crafters, Foot Clinic, Fireside, Men’s Group, Worship committee, Meditation Group. Please email them to the Parish Office before 18th August. Accompanying photos also welcome! The AGM will be held in September.

Fireside will meet on Wednesday 29th July at 1.30pm for a post-lockdown get together in the lounge. All women are very welcome to join us. Contact Margaret  366 8936 for more information.

Keeping safe in Alert Level 1

If you’re sick, stay home. If you have cold or flu symptoms call your doctor or Healthline for advice. Wash your hands regularly with soap.

Sneeze and cough into your elbow, and regularly disinfect shared surfaces.

Keep track of where you’ve been and who you’ve seen to help contact tracing if needed. Stay vigilant. Whatever you’re feeling — it’s okay. Be kind to others. Be kind to yourself.

Posted in News | Comments Off on Sunday 19th July 2020

Sunday 12 July 2020

A very warm welcome to all who worship here today. Please stay for a cuppa and a chat after the service. Many thanks to Rev Alan Webster for leading our worship today. Rev Chris Elliot will be with us next week.

NEXT SUNDAY: Soup & Rolls provided by Session for all – please stay and enjoy a light meal and spend time catching up.

What’s On This Week:

Monday 1-4pm Foot Clinic. To find out more, talk to Lyndsey 388 1264.

Tuesday 10am – 2pm South Elder Care. Lyndsey 388 1264.

Tuesday 7.15pm Christian Meditation Group. Contact Dugald 380 5024.

Thursday 10am – 12 noon Crafty Crafters. Bring along your own craft items or learn a new skill. $3 per session. Jeannette 332 9869.

Thursday 1.30 – 2.30pm Sit & Keep Fit. See Anneke for more information.

Wednesday Walkers 15th July (rescheduled): Meet 9.30am Air Force Museum Carpark for a walk around the Wigram area. Coffee will be at the Air Force Museum. All Welcome.    Benjamin Elliffe 332 7700.

Formation of a Pastoral Visiting Team beginning on Monday 3rd August at 9.30am with morning tea on the Lounge. A six week interactive course for those who would like to be pastoral visitors. You may have done several courses before but the important part is that we are all on the same page. A group of 8-10 people would be great. A pamphlet is available in the foyer which outlines the course content. Everyone is welcome. Please write your name on the clipboard being circulated this morning, or contact Lyndsey McKay 388 1264; email lyndseymckay1@gmail.com

Fireside will meet on Wednesday 29th July at 1.30pm for a post-lockdown get together in the lounge. Other women are very welcome to join us. Contact Margaret  366 8936 for more information.

Gateways Community Scotland

The Gateways community is a fresh expression community. See their story here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-QhYiuGs5oA

Keeping safe in Alert Level 1

If you’re sick, stay home. If you have cold or flu symptoms call your doctor or Healthline for advice. Wash your hands regularly with soap.

Sneeze and cough into your elbow, and regularly disinfect shared surfaces.

Keep track of where you’ve been and who you’ve seen to help contact tracing if needed. Stay vigilant. Whatever you’re feeling — it’s okay. Be kind to others. Be kind to yourself.

Posted in News | Comments Off on Sunday 12 July 2020